Song of steel and mithril

As Mark has mentioned here, while he was visiting Melbourne I asked him to give me couple of refresher games of Song of Blades and Heroes. Mark has played the game a few more times than me, and has invested time in crafting some pretty interesting warbands. After helping me review a warband I’d built a while ago (and neglected to include anyone with the Leader trait) we got down to business.

In the first game, Mark fielded his Islesmen against my fantasy Samurai ‘Takeda Clan’.

Mark's Islesmen. Pay no attention to the geisha in the pigsty.

Mark’s Islesmen. Pay no attention to the geisha in the pigsty.

We played the Ambush scenario, where the defender sets up with counters (including dummies). The scope for an actual ambush seems quite limited in the scenario, because the defender is still only a short move from the base edge, so we decided that I could set up further onto the table. Unfortunately the dummy counters weren’t the only dummies around, because I inadvertantly switched my leader, Lord Kumano and one of my other samurai (Yahagi the berserker). We noticed that when Mark’s archers moved into range. The next dumb thing was that we forgot that all my samurai had the Heavy Armour trait, so Kumano was knocked down when he was hit by an arrow.

Lord Kumano takes a tumble.

Lord Kumano takes a tumble.

The next archer killed him with a Gruesome Kill, so most of my force (besides my cowardly mage, Agano, who fled the field) flocked back towards the standard. My third samurai, Kuma, delivered the high point of the game for me, by causing one of the archers to stumble with a Running Blow.

The high point of the game, Kuma makes an archer trip over (top right of the  picture). Note Yahagi the cowardly berserker at the rear of my warband.

The high point of the game, Kuma makes an archer trip over (top right of the picture). Note Yahagi the cowardly berserker at the rear of my warband.

But my force was all over the place by then. Mark’s fighters caught one of my warrior monks and scored another Gruesome Kill, and it was all over.

In the second game we played the Treasure Hunt scenario, finally using the treasure markers I made in May last year. Mark fielded a his elvish warband of only five high quality figures – a mage, his bear bodyguard, two archers, and a sneaky forester. Mark’s forester started the game by racing off to check out one of the ‘potential treasure’ markers, but the treasure wasn’t there.

Mark's Forester inspects some possible treasure

Mark’s Forester inspects some possible treasure

My warrior monks raced toward another one, but it too was not the one. One of Mark’s archers made it to the pigsty where the third marker was, but he was a little short of the marker. Stopping to fire his bow, he realised he’d left his arrows in Lothlorien (he rolled a double one).

Mark's forester is hightailing it back to the safety of his group, while my warrior monks have just checked another treasure marker. The real treasure must be in the pigsty, just visible behind the large building.

Mark’s forester is hightailing it back to the safety of his group, while my warrior monks have just checked another treasure marker. The real treasure must be in the pigsty, just visible behind the large building.

My monks charged off and waylaid the elvish mage. They looked like they were onto a good thing when they managed to knock the mage’s bear down, but Mark’s elves intervened.

My warrior monks scrapping with the elf mage's bear bodyguard.

My warrior monks scrapping with the elf mage’s bear bodyguard.

In the ensuing melee the monks managed to kill the forester, but a combination of the mage transfixing a figure and another figure despatching it led to the death of my monks, which was enough to send the rest of the warband fleeing.

The winning team

The winning team

Yahagi the berserker once again managed to avoid combat. I think it’s time to give him the coward trait!

Great fun. I need to include some of my archer figures in my warband I think, as well as practicing the fine art of keeping my warband together.

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3 responses to “Song of steel and mithril

  1. Great photos and the terrain was neat too. Luck was on my side in both games; however, despite your woeful luck, I was disappointed that not one of your warband slipped in the ford!

    • My leader was somewhat somnolent at crucial moments… and don’t forget that most of the time my troops were fleeing across the ford… and my troops flee as swiftly as roes on the hillside!

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